‘ In Solidarity

For December before we say goodbye! – Y5’s

We didn’t find time to do this, but I’ll try to organize something for January if students agree! We can’t forget about people in prison, can we?

Something I’d like us to do in class, but only if you agree, is to write to one, two, a few, quite a bunch of people in prison, like prisoners of conscience, nonviolent activists…

I suggest we write to Chelsea Manning, at least.

We need:

  • info about prisoners (and a list of prisoners if we want to write more) coming from a reliable source (e.g. Amnesty International, War Resisters’ International)
  • sheets of paper and / or postcards
  • envelopes
  • something to write with + colo(u)r pens, markers, crayons, pencils…
  • stamps for the continent or country where the prisoner lives

How are we going to get these materials?

  • Should each person bring their pack for 1 prisoner or 5 or 10?
  • Should you arrange something in class? Who is willing to help in this? Talk to me, or volunteer at Plenary, OK?

Getting Organized

  • You could ask for donations of postcards, envelopes, stamps!
  • You can ask your friends, colleagues, classmates, to get together for an hour, to write those postcards or letters together!

Reading about / Writing to Prisoners

  • We talk about the different kinds of texts we’re going to write (postcards to prisoners?, letters to editors?, enquiry emails to support groups?)
  • We read about the person/people in prison, or talk about that person.
  • Then students work on their texts for each of the “adopted” prisoner(s).
  • Next goes writing the addresses on the envelopes.
  • Finally, if the stamps are in class, we glue them on the envelopes!
  • Then a group or each person takes on the responsibility of posting the letters.

Letters are amazing for prisoners. They keep them company. They cheer them up and more.

Amnesty International has a great deal of addresses of people you pussyriotcould write to.  Tools & Tips for Effective e-Activism (36 pdf pages)

War Resisters’ International organizes Prisoners for Peace at the beginning of December, and I’ll link to it list of prisoners with addresses we can write to.

More People in Jail

  • peltierI’m trying to find out what’s happened to Leonard Peltier: read about him. I wish we could write to him, because he loves to hear from people! We need to ask over here: email: info@leonardpeltier.net

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leonard_Peltier

Federal Bureau of Prisons
Leonard Peltier
#89637-132
PO BOX 474701
Des Moines Iowa 50747-0001

Chelsea (Bradley) Manning –  Private Manning Support Network

http://www.privatemanning.org/learn-more/write-to-bradley-manning

You can write to Pvt. Manning at the address below.  While the outside of the envelope must be marked “Bradley Manning,” Pvt. Manning will be happy to accept letters that refer to her with her chosen name Chelsea on the inside. bradley-manning1-650x433She has also expressed that within the letters, she would prefer people address her as “Ms.” rather than using any military title.

PVT Bradley E Manning
89289
1300 N Warehouse Rd
Ft Leavenworth KS 66027-2304
USA

Pvt. Chelsea Manning is currently eligible to receive mail from anyone who wishes to write.

There are restrictions on what you can send. The military will reject any mail that violates postal regulations or contains obscenity, blackmail, contraband or threats. Additionally:

Pvt. Manning cannot receive any cash, checks, or money orders. Her legal team is currently responsible for ensuring that she has sufficient funds in her detainee account to purchase items such as stamps, envelopes, toothpaste, etc.

Photographs are only accepted if printed on copy paper. A maximum of six (6) pages are allowed. Pictures on photograph weight paper are not allowed.

Incoming mail will be returned to the sender if, in the opinion of the confinement facility, falls into any of the following categories: 1) Contains inflammatory material or advocates escape, violence, disorder or assault; 2) Directly or indirectly threatens the security, safety or order of the facility; 3) Contains coded or otherwise undecipherable language that prevents adequate review of the material; 4) Is received with “Postage Due”; or 5) Contains items of contraband (including anything of any material value, including postage stamps or cigarettes).

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6 Responses to ‘ In Solidarity

  1. Pingback: Y5′s – Celebrating Human Rights Day – Dec 10 | Plans & What We Did In Class

  2. Jeff Nguyen says:

    You can send cards/letters:

    Leonard Peltier
    #89637-132
    USP Coleman I
    P.O. Box 1033
    Coleman, FL 33521

  3. Jeff Nguyen says:

    Here’s the link to Leonard Peltier Defense Offense Committee: http://www.whoisleonardpeltier.info/us.htm

  4. MF says:

    Oh, thanks! I’ll organize it then for January. Tomorrow is our last day of class. Thanks again!
    And so happy you found the Howard Clark interview! (I created a temporary little page here too, for him, collecting links, because he’s just died suddenly.) Have a lovely end of year! And let’s go for 2014!!! 🙂

  5. Pingback: Some of the new stuff on talking people.net | Plans & What We Did In Class

  6. Pingback: Please, read, watch, and if you understand, sign! | Plans & What We Did In Class

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